Get Active to Lower Your Cancer Risk

Being active can take many different forms: walking, cycling, recreation like dancing, and yoga. Indirect physical activity can also be undertaken while working or around the home. The great news is that all forms of physical activity can offer up a good dose of health benefits if done regularly and at an appropriate intensity and sufficient duration.
Get Active to Lower Your Cancer Risk
Get Active to Lower Your Cancer Risk

You have the best training gear like expensive sneakers and the latest heart rate monitor.

Now time to get active.

Being active can take many different forms:
walking, cycling, recreation like dancing, and yoga.

Indirect physical activity can also be undertaken while working or around the home.

The great news is that all forms of physical activity can offer up a good dose of health benefits if done regularly and at an appropriate intensity and sufficient duration.

Did you know that as
many as one-third of most cancers
can be prevented
1 by being active

(along with a healthy diet and weight)?1

While this is great news, the trouble is that 1 in 4 adults around the world is not active enough.2

There is strong evidence that being active can decrease the risk of cancers of the colon and breast3
(for both pre-and post-menopausal women).

On the contrary, there is also evidence to suggest that being sedentary increases the risk for cancer of the endometrium.

Being active is also an important part of the puzzle to manage a healthy weight,  and we know that there is strong evidence that being overweight or obese increases the risk of various cancers4 such as cancer of the mouth, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, stomach, pancreas, gall bladder, liver, colon, breast (post-menopause), ovary, endometrium (womb), prostate and kidney.

So how much physical activity should we be aiming for per week?

The World Health Organisation5 has very clear guidelines on how active we should be for our heart health, muscular fitness, bone health and to reduce the risk of many diseases (like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer)
and also for mental health like depression.

A minimum exercise target:

  • Adults should aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity each week or do at least 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity. You can also do the equivalent combination of moderate and vigorous-intensity activity.
  • Aerobic activity should be performed in bouts of at least 10 minutes duration.

Optimal exercise targets:

  • For additional health benefits, adults should increase their moderate-intensity activity to 300 minutes per week or take part in 150 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity.The equivalent combination of both moderate and vigorous-intensity activity is also advised.
  • Muscle-strengthening activities should be done involving major muscle groups on at least two days a week.

The FitChef Difference

At FitChef, we firmly believe that being active, as well as good food choices, are important for a healthy and balanced lifestyle.

Our FitChef Sports Performance Kits are great for high-end performance, but our popular 21-day and 1-month starter kits are also tailored to suit the busy and active lifestyle of the busy and active.

Exercise is essential as it can add years to your life and life to your years!

Exercise regulates hormones, boosts dopamine and general feel-good factors, clears the mind, opens the chest, lowers anxiety, improves sleep, and even helps control cravings and hunger once your body adjusts to a higher metabolic rate.

Always build up exercise levels up slowly, change them up and actively aim to avoid injuries, ask experts for help!

Eat good food for recovery, warm-up, and stretch well.

Learn to listen to your body and slow down if you need to (rather exercise slowly for a lifetime than injure yourself for short-term intensity).

Exercise seems so simple on the surface but there is always a lot more you can do to get more enjoyment and results from your time investment.

References:

  1. World Cancer Research Fund/ American Inspiration for Cancer Research. Diet, Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Cancer: A Global Perspective. Continuous Update Project Expert Report. 2018. Available at www.dietandcancerreport.org
  2. Global action plan on physical activity 2018–2030: more active people for a healthier world. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2018.
  3. Word Cancer Research Fund/ American Institute for Cancer Research Continuous Update Project Export Report 2018. Physical Activity and the Risk of Cancer. Available at www.dietandcancerreport.org.
  4. Word Cancer Research Fund/ American Institute for Cancer Research Continuous Update Project Export Report 2018. Body Fatness and Weight Gain and the Risk of Cancer. Available at www.dietandcancerreport.org.
  5. World Health Organisation. Global recommendations on physical activity for health. 2010. Available at https://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/global-PA-recs-2010.pdf.
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